Spandex

Spandex or elastane is a synthetic fiber known for its exceptional stretchability. It is stronger and more durable than rubber, its major plant competitor. It was invented in 1959, and when first introduced it revolutionized many areas of the clothing industry.

Spandex is the preferred name in North America, while elastane is most often used elsewhere. A well-known trademark for spandex or elastane is DuPont's brand name Lycra, another trademark (also DuPont's) is Elaspan.

Table of contents
1 Spandex fiber characteristics
2 Major spandex fiber uses
3 Production
4 See also
5 External links

Spandex fiber characteristics

Major spandex fiber uses

Production

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission definition for spandex fiber is "A manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is a long chain synthetic polymer comprised of at least 85 percent of a segmented polyurethane."

First U.S. commercial spandex fiber production: 1959, DuPont Company.

Current U.S. spandex fiber producers: DuPont Textiles & Interiors; Globe Manufacturing Company; Bayer Corporation

See also

External links




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